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What You Need to Know About Getting a Bladder Biopsy

Any invasive procedure can seem intimidating, especially if you have no idea what it entails. When a doctor recommends you for a biopsy, don’t panic. It is just a procedure used to collect tissue samples from an organ. This helps specialists determine if it has health problems or cellular abnormalities.

A bladder biopsy may be performed during a cystoscopy, which is when specialists look inside your urethra and bladder with a cystoscope. This is a small camera with a light, mounted on a thin tube, and inserted through a body cavity. There are several things you should know to help you prepare for this procedure, we’ve outlined some of them below.

Before the procedure: how to prepare

You must inform your healthcare provider about other courses of treatment you have; if you’re taking medicines for other conditions, they should know about it way in advance. For example, you should not be taking blood thinners like aspirin and ibuprofen, as this will cause complications during the biopsy. Furthermore, you must be aware of whether or not you are allergic to contrast liquid or to anesthesia. Both of these may be used in the procedure.

In addition to these, your doctor will likely advise you to fast for eight hours before the procedure. Depending on your reasons for having a biopsy, they might ask you to take certain medicines or to drink a large amount of water beforehand. Before your operation, you should also have made arrangements for your trip home.

During the procedure: what will happen

Your healthcare provider will use general or local anesthesia to keep you pain-free. General anesthesia will induce sleep and prevent you from feeling the entire procedure. With the local kind, you will not feel pain, but there will be some pressure while they perform their tasks.

The biopsy will start with the provider placing the cystoscopy through your urethra and up into the bladder. The doctor will look at the urethral walls, and your bladder will be filled with a clear liquid. This helps them see your insides better.

When they are sure of the placement of instruments, they will guide an instrument into the bladder and use this to take a tissue sample. This will be sent to the laboratory for analysis, and you will receive aftercare and sent to your ward or room for observation.

After the procedure: recovery and following up

After a biopsy, a patient needs to rest and recover. Healthcare providers will monitor you for pain in the area where the procedure was performed, and they will help you manage the symptoms. They will also be looking for excessive amounts of blood in the urine. When they are sure that you are free to go, you will receive your orders for discharging.

For the first few hours after the biopsy, you might see trace amounts of blood in your urine; this is normal, as is difficulty in urinating. Excessive urination, burning, or mild discomfort in the bladder or kidney areas are also probable side effects. These take about 24 to 48 hours before they wear off. Furthermore, general anesthesia has lingering effects on perception and cognition; you should not drive yourself home if this is what your doctor used.

Risks of undergoing a bladder biopsy

As with all procedures, you sign up for risks when you have a biopsy on your bladder. You might get a UTI, or a urinary tract infection. You might also develop a blockage in your urethra, or experience excessive pain while urinating. In extreme cases, you might rupture your bladder during the procedure, or bleed more than expected. These are all circumstances that can be prevented, though, especially if you have good healthcare professionals looking after you.

Conclusion

Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately.

For more information on urologic care and services, get in touch with the University Urology Associates of New Jersey. We continuously strive to provide comprehensive, state-of-the-art services with an emphasis on patient education.

Disclaimer: All content found on the UUANJ.COM Website, including text, images, audio, or other formats were created for informational purposes only.

The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call 911 immediately.